Running Dime as Your Base – A Lesson From the Big 12

Welcome to the Big 12 where Dime has now become your base.

The Big 12 has always been on the outer limits of what coaches are willing to do on offense and a graveyard for “guru” defensive coordinators (just ask Diaz and Strong). Defenses in the Big 12 play more snaps than the average Power 5 defense. Tempo and the Air Raid reign supreme in a league that prides itself on scoring points. The knock on the league has always been the defenses in the conference. To many outsiders, the Big 12 is offense first, and it is, but if you are looking to defend the spread, there is no other place to look – they live with it every day.

If looking at defensive stats alone, the Big 12 is on the outside looking in, but there is something to be learned here. Starting in 2016, teams in the Big 12, primarily Oklahoma St. (2016) and Iowa St. (2017), began using a modified Dime (3-down) and Nickle (4-down) package to combat the Air Raid heavy teams in the league. I discussed in January’s article about how teams are becoming more fluid in their fronts; switching from 4-down to 3-down without losing scheme.

The Dime package utilized by Iowa St. in 2017 was no different. Versus a run-heavy Oklahoma team, the Cyclones relied on a modified 4-down defense to defeat the Sooners in Norman. There ability to switch from a 4-down to a 3-down without subbing made the scheme a perfect fit for the multiple Sooners. With a TE like Mark Andrews and an H-back like Dimitri Flowers, the Sooners could give multiple looks without subbing. This fact alone is why the Big 12 is so innovative on defense. Hybrid players are a premium in the league. In Iowa St.’s season finale versus a high-powered spread attack in Memphis, Iowa St. utilized the 3-down version of their hybrid Dime to defeat Memphis 21-20.

The Dime/Nickel hybrid defense has become Iowa St.’s base defense and is fluid between the different front structures. When the Cyclones go 4-down, it is no different than if they are blitzing a linebacker from their Dime package. The coverages are similar too. Here is a look at the two base defenses:

Oklahoma St. Nickel (4-Down)

02 Cy Ni Base

Cyclone Dime (3-Down)

06 Cy Di Base Continue reading “Running Dime as Your Base – A Lesson From the Big 12”

Breaking Down the Pass

MatchQuarters guide to breaking down your opponents passing data.

.00 Combo.png

Once the down and distance data (D&D) and formation data are placed into a breakdown, the task turns to breaking down the plays an offense runs. Breaking down the run can be easy as long as the coaches inputting data speak the same language. At the root level, power is a power, a counter is a counter, and a zone is a zone. The biggest task in breaking down the run is if the team is a read/option team and deciding who the conflicted player is (who are they reading). In many cases, especially at the high school level, the plays are basic and can be easily labeled. Pass plays, on the other hand, are a whole different animal.

Unlike run plays that have a base set of rules and can easily be determined, pass concepts can get muddy fast. With so many moving parts and different tags to concepts, it is hard for defensive coaches to look at pass data and not have a convoluted mess. With so many variations within offenses and different tags for certain players, it can make a defensive coordinator feel like he is lost in a sea of data. Add the factor of formations (2×2 versus 3×1 pass can be much different) and it multiplies the problem.  Continue reading “Breaking Down the Pass”

Breaking Down an Opponent

Using specific data fields to find tendencies in your opponent.

My main responsibility at Baylor was to be in charge of our opponent scouting. To anyone that knows me, I am a breakdown nerd and am content sitting in a dark room all day inputting data. To me, there is nothing more exciting than objectively looking at an opponent and inputting data to mine for tendencies. There is an art to breaking down an opponent, and everyone has a different way of doing it. The objective for this article is to explain my process and to hopefully help a few coaches along the way. Not everyone enjoys the breakdown process like I do or even knows what to do with all the analytical data. I’ll try and show you a process that has worked for me and highlights tendencies within an offense. Like anything, to truly understand something you must know the “why” behind it. My goal is to explain the process in a way that makes sense to a novice.

01-hc
Use the breakdown data to create a visual representation of an offense like the one in the hit chart above.

The key to a great opponent scouting system is to approach it like a science and keep it concise. In order to get the most out of your breakdowns, you have to find a true medium between too little information and too much information. To find that perfect medium you have to understand the limitations of your staff and define what you need to know, so when you sit down to create a hit chart and cut-ups the information is easy to use. If you approach a breakdown like you are looking for a needle in a haystack (Ex. – creating a data column for every single data point possible), you can bog your staff down and get lost in data. During my three years at Baylor, I felt confident we developed that perfect medium for what our defensive coordinator, Phil Bennett, needed in order to be successful on the field. After being back the high school ranks for three years, I feel even more confident that I have found a way to break down opponents concisely while not losing myself in data points.

Continue reading “Breaking Down an Opponent”

Developing Down and Distance Data

How to break down the D&D data.

Down and Distance (D&D) seems easy enough, right? As the offense moves along the field, their play calling is predicated on the down (how many more plays they have left to get ten yards) and the distance (how many yards they need to get so they can start over). It is a very simplistic stat, but it has major ramifications on how offenses call their plays. Looking at the D&D stat from a simplistic eye will give a defensive coach a wide range look at how often a team runs or passes on a given down. Add personnel groupings and the data begins to get clearer.

2nd-down-markerjpg1428337613141.jpegIn order to truly get a grasp of what an offense is doing you have to create D&D groupings for long (7+), medium (4-6), and short yardage situations (1-3). This can allow a DC to pinpoint what plays are more likely in situations, allowing him to call the correct blitz or pressure at the right moment. Defense is reactionary, thus needs to react off the data that is provided by particular stats, in this case, the D&D. Pundits and coaches say it all the time, football is a situational game. The chess match that is football attests its strategy on several factors: field position, D&D, and what personnel grouping are on the field. Branching from that, formations and run/pass stats. For the sake of this article, MatchQuarters will discuss the breakdown of D&D and talk about the intricacies of each grouping. To understand completely what an offense is trying to do, the D&D should be looked at objectively with field positions groupings. The two data points combined give a true glimpse into the mind of the opponent’s OC.  Continue reading “Developing Down and Distance Data”