Running Dime as Your Base – A Lesson From the Big 12

Welcome to the Big 12 where Dime has now become your base.

The Big 12 has always been on the outer limits of what coaches are willing to do on offense and a graveyard for “guru” defensive coordinators (just ask Diaz and Strong). Defenses in the Big 12 play more snaps than the average Power 5 defense. Tempo and the Air Raid reign supreme in a league that prides itself on scoring points. The knock on the league has always been the defenses in the conference. To many outsiders, the Big 12 is offense first, and it is, but if you are looking to defend the spread, there is no other place to look – they live with it every day.

If looking at defensive stats alone, the Big 12 is on the outside looking in, but there is something to be learned here. Starting in 2016, teams in the Big 12, primarily Oklahoma St. (2016) and Iowa St. (2017), began using a modified Dime (3-down) and Nickle (4-down) package to combat the Air Raid heavy teams in the league. I discussed in January’s article about how teams are becoming more fluid in their fronts; switching from 4-down to 3-down without losing scheme.

The Dime package utilized by Iowa St. in 2017 was no different. Versus a run-heavy Oklahoma team, the Cyclones relied on a modified 4-down defense to defeat the Sooners in Norman. There ability to switch from a 4-down to a 3-down without subbing made the scheme a perfect fit for the multiple Sooners. With a TE like Mark Andrews and an H-back like Dimitri Flowers, the Sooners could give multiple looks without subbing. This fact alone is why the Big 12 is so innovative on defense. Hybrid players are a premium in the league. In Iowa St.’s season finale versus a high-powered spread attack in Memphis, Iowa St. utilized the 3-down version of their hybrid Dime to defeat Memphis 21-20.

The Dime/Nickel hybrid defense has become Iowa St.’s base defense and is fluid between the different front structures. When the Cyclones go 4-down, it is no different than if they are blitzing a linebacker from their Dime package. The coverages are similar too. Here is a look at the two base defenses:

Oklahoma St. Nickel (4-Down)

02 Cy Ni Base

Cyclone Dime (3-Down)

06 Cy Di Base Continue reading “Running Dime as Your Base – A Lesson From the Big 12”

Structuring Your Defense – The Front

Just like coverages, a defense should have different fronts to combat a variety of formations & schemes.

Just like coverages in a secondary, a defense cannot live in one front or technique on the defensive line. How a defense structures its front line has a direct correlation to how an offense is going to attack it. Most defensive coaches in America understand that the defensive line is critical to not only stopping the run but putting pressure on the quarterback when he drops back to pass. It is no stretch to say that the top teams in any level of football usually have one of the best defensive fronts for that level.

The front, and subsequently the strength call, create the first line of defense against an offense. In a well-formulated defense, the front seven (and even the secondary) act as links in a chain. The anchor points of these links are always the defensive linemen. Understanding how these links react to each other is critical in developing a plan to stop offenses. Not every front (or strength call) is equal to one another.

Some fronts and techniques are better suited to defend Spread offenses than Power ones, and vice versa. For this reason, defensive coaches should carry multiple fronts for multiple situations. Just like a defense’s coverages and alignments are different when defending a Wing-T team compared to a 10 personnel Air Raid offense, different defensive fronts can help combat the multitude of offenses seen throughout the year, and why every defensive coordinator should carry several fronts in his toolbox.

The advancement (and acceptance) of hybrid players have led many DC’s to switch from three-down to four-down in the same game (or even during the season – game to game). To the point of being multiple and carrying a plethora of calls on the call sheet, Don Brown, Defensive Coordinator for Michigan insist, “If you have more answers in your toolbox then you can go to them throughout the season and it’s a matter of just getting them back on recall.” Having a multitude of options at a defense’s disposal can only add to what it can ultimately stop. More is simply, just more. It comes down to how well you can teach it. Continue reading “Structuring Your Defense – The Front”

MQ’s Link Book | #ArtofX

Find everything you need in one place.

MatchQuarters.com’s Philosophy of Football

** Each link will open in a new window, so bookmark this page and get to reading!**

Go deeper into defending the spread with MQ’s Book:

Cautious Aggression: Defending Modern Football

Description | Buy it now

:: Connect With MQ ::

–         Twitter          –          YouTube          –          Instagram         –

Defending the Spread

Run Fits

  1. Zero the Mike (Belly-Key)
  2. Using Natural Gap Exchanges in Your Front Seven
  3.  Line Twists to Combat Heavy Zone Teams
  4. Defending the Zone Read
  5. Defending the Power Read
  6. Defending Split Zone
  7. 5 Tips for Defending Spread Option Teams
  8. Defending BAsh (“Back Away”) Concepts
  9. Defending 20p Two-Back Power

Defensive Structure/Special Coverages/Dime Package

  1. Structuring Your Defense – The Front
  2. Saban’s Rip/Liz (Match Cov. 3) & How it Applies to Quarters
  3. Running Dime as Your Base
  4. Defending the Air Raid with “Steal” Coverage
  5. “Read” Coverage (20p Field Robber)
  6. MQ’s Simple 3-Down Dime Package
  7. Don Brown (Univ. of Michigan) Lone Star Clinic Notes

Quick or “Pop” Motions

  1. Defending Jet Motion
  2. Defending A-Behind and Flare Motion

Defending Spread Formations (10 Pers.)

  1. Defending 10p 2×2 Pistol
  2. Defending Stack and Bunch Sets
  3. Defending Trips/Empty:
    1. Why You Should Run an Under Front to 3×1 Sets
    2. Defending Trips — Fitting the Run
    3. Top Trips Coverages Explained
    4. Specific Split Field Trips Coverages:
      1. Defending Trips with Stress Coverage
      2. Defending Trips with Special Coverage
      3. Defending 3×1 Formations with Solo Coverage
    5. Defending Empty and Quads
  4. Defending Pro Spread (11p)
    1. 11 Personnel (Pro Spread)
    2. Defending single-width or “nub” formations
  5. Defending the Spread’s Top Unbalanced Sets

Defending RPOs ::

  1. RPO Stop Calls
  2. Using Split-Field Coverage to Counteract RPO & Check-With-Me Offenses

Defending Formations/Personnel Groups

  1. 12 Personnel (Ace/Ace Trey)
  2. 20 Personnel — Over vs Under (Setting the Strength)
  3. 21 Personnel (Defending Power Football From a Hybrid Defense)
  4. 30 Personnel
  5. Defending the Wing-T

Stop Calls/Pressures/Blitzes

  1. 5 Tips for Developing a Blitz
  2. How to Packaging Blitz Calls
  3. Building a Better Zone Blitz
  4. Blitzing the Formation (BTF)
  5. Run Down Stop Calls
  6. Dog Check (Single-Dog Pressure)
  7. Attacking Empty/Quads
  8. 5 Tips For Blitzing From The Secondary

Quarters Pedagogy and Drill Tapes

  1. MQ’s DB Resource Page
  2. Teaching the Safeties
  3. Teaching the Corners
  4. Daily Musts for DBs
  5. Match Quarters Pass Distributions
  6. LB Philosophy and Fundamentals

3-4 Resources

  1. The Okie Front
  2. Defending Modern Spread from Okie
  3. Baylor vs Boise (2016) – How a hybrid 3-4 defends a multiple Pro Spread offense
  4. Defending 11p from a 3-4
  5. The Tite Front (303/404)
  6. 3rd Down Calls From a 3-4

Analytics/Install/Opponent Breakdowns/Practice/Self-Scout

  1. Four Day Install Plan for a 4-2-5
  2. Breaking Down an Opponent
  3. Down & Distance Data
  4. Breaking Down the Run
  5. Breaking Down the Pass
  6. Building a Hit Chart
  7. Weekly Schedule (Practice Plan)
  8. 5 Cut-ups to Improve Your Self-Scout
  9. Throw Out the Stats – “What really is a “good” defense?”

 

© 2016 -2018 MatchQuarters.com | Cody Alexander | All rights reserved.


As always, support the site by following me on Twitter (@The_Coach_A) and spreading the word to your coaching friends by liking and retweeting the articles you read (even sharing them via Facebook and LinkedIn).

Do not hesitate to email me with questions through the site’s CONTACT page or through my DM on Twitter. I enjoy speaking with you guys (iron sharpens iron).

Make sure to bookmark this page which is updated after each article.

– Coach A.

The Not So “Odd” Front – The 3-4 Okie

The evolution and application of football’s most multiple front.

When Phil Bennett took over the Baylor defense in the Spring of 2011 he was taking on a massive overhaul of a traditionally porous defense. Baylor was coming off a 2010 campaign that witnessed a 6-7 season and an abysmal showing in the Texas Bowl, losing to a then 6-6 Illinois team 14-38. Though the season was a success by traditional Baylor standards and the first bowl game since 1994, Coach Art Briles wanted to take the program to take the next level and knew in order to do that he needed to hire someone to clean up his defense.

In steps Bennett, currently the interim Head Coach of Pitt, and coming off a bowl victory over the Kentucky Wildcats, was also looking for a job. Briles that winter approached Bennett to revamp the Baylor defense. With a future Heisman at QB (Robert Griffen III), Briles needed just enough from his defense to get the Baylor program moving in a historic direct and he felt Bennett had enough experience to get the job done. Bennett, a Texas native, signed on to the task and the rest is history.

Screen Shot 2018-05-15 at 2.05.48 PM
Phil Bennett’s historical Defensive Efficiency rankings according to BCfToys.com (’08 – ’15).

In 2015, and coming off of back-to-back Big 12 Championships, Coach Bennett ran into a serious issue during the season – lack of defensive line depth. Through both Big 12 Championship seasons, the D-line had been one of the star units for the unexpected rise to respectability of Baylor’s defense. Anyone who watched Baylor under Bennett’s tenure (and even his time at Pitt) knows that Bennett based heavily out of a four-down 4-2-5/4-3 structure. Faced with little D-line depth and injuries to key players during the 2015 season, Bennett was forced to turn to a three-down front.

The transition, for the most part, was a smooth one. The ’15 Baylor Bears were able to end up in the top 50 in Defense Efficiency (44th according to BCfToys.com), and the Bears ended up ranked #13 overall with a 9-3 record culminating the season with a 49-38 victory over North Carolina (with no QB). How was Baylor able to keep a steady hand on the defense while completely changing their defensive structure? They just switch to a hybrid Under Front, replaced the boundary defensive end with an outside linebacker/hybrid in Taylor Young, and kept their run fits and pass distributions the same. Something defenses have been perfecting since the ’70s. Continue reading “The Not So “Odd” Front – The 3-4 Okie”