5 Tips for Defending Spread Option Teams

MQ details 5 things to remember when facing a Spread Option team.

One offensive play that has not lost its power in modern football is the option. Spread offenses utilize option principles to test the mettle of a defense’s structure. An option offense forces the defense to play assignment football. Each player on a defense must stay gap sound and understand how the structure of the defense adapts versus each option play. When defending an offense that runs a variation of the Triple Option from Spread formations, a defense must have three main components: 1) a Dive player, 2) a Quarterback player, & 3) a pitch-man. Add pulling guards and trap plays and a Spread Option offense can inflict a lot of damage if the defense is not disciplined.

One of the main keys for defending Spread Option teams is eye discipline. It is imperative that each position on a defense understands his fits and read keys. When option teams motion it creates eye “candy” and distractors for defenders, especially at the linebacker level (Jet or Orbit motion). Spread Option teams also make it difficult to blitz. When applying pressure to an option offense the defense can expose itself to being a man short if the players do not understand how the pressure changes option responsibilities.

Many defenses choose to stay in base and fit the option. This can work if the defense has better players than the offense, but in most cases staying static helps the offense learn how to pinpoint a defense’s weaknesses. Understanding how Spread Option teams want to attack a defense’s structure is crucial in defending option offenses. Below are 5 tips for defending these types of teams:  Continue reading “5 Tips for Defending Spread Option Teams”

Defending 11 Personnel from a 3-4

How to adjust to TE sets without a natural adjuster.

Spread and Pro-Style offenses utilize a Tight End versus three-down defenses because the defense lacks a natural adjuster. Unlike a four-down defense that can distribute their anchor points evenly across the formation, the 3-4 lacks the extra lineman to defend the extra gap (hence the name “Odd Front”). When faced with an 11 personnel formation, many 3-4 defensive coordinators choose to spin to single-high coverage to gain an extra man in the box. Another adjustment for many DCs in this situation is to attach the outside linebacker to the TE’s side. With the loss of a coverage man and overhang, the DC is forced to spin. When defending an 11 pers. offense from a 4-2-5 or 4-3, these little adjustments aren’t needed because the anchor points are evenly distributed and don’t need to be created.

In a four-down scheme, the defensive ends act as the walls of the box. When a TE is introduced into the formation, the DE to the TE’s side moves to a 9 technique (unless it is Trey and then he is in a 7 or 6i). The four defensive lineman allow the defense to stay even and adjust with the linebackers and secondary. The evenness of the four-down is why many spread teams attack 4-2-5 and 4-3 defenses from 20 pers., utilizing an H-back. In 20 pers., the offense can use the “H” to attack either side of the defense, reading the overhangs to determine what play to run. If the “H” was attached to the formation (TE) he would lose his two-way go.

Defending 11 pers. formations from a 3-4 boil down to understanding how certain fronts react to the extra gap. From a single-gap fit 3-4, a defense can easily adjust to TE sets and stay within a two-shell scheme. The lack of an adjuster is an issue, which is why many 3-4 teams that face the spread, and Pro-Style spread, choose to defend from an Okie Front because it reacts much like the four-down Under Front. Using the offense’s formations as a guide, it is easy to build simple rules within the defense, setting the strength and when to attach the OLBs, to alleviate the issues seen in many 3-4 defenses. Combining an Okie Front with a match quarters scheme can adapt and flex with any formation an offense throws out, it just boils down to how a DC chooses to line up.

Continue reading “Defending 11 Personnel from a 3-4”

MQ’s Defending RPOs Clinic Tape

Defending RPO’s from a 3-4 Okie Front.

The clinic includes detailed explanations on how to combat RPOs by pre-snap alignment and even explains several stop calls, all from a 3-4 Okie Front. The clinic starts with five principles for defending RPO offenses and moves on to pre-snap alignments against top spread formations. This is followed by game film and diagrams of the stop calls with detailed explanations.

(This video was originally created for Keith Grabowski, host of the “Coach & Coordinator Show” before he joined USA Football and moved his show under their umbrella.)

Continue reading “MQ’s Defending RPOs Clinic Tape”

Four Day Install Plan

MQ’s guide to installing a 4-2-5.

.01 Install Topper.pngWith Spring Football starting in my state of Texas I wanted to address the installation plan for a 4-2-5. Most coaches have a three-day non-contact period and want to get as much teaching done as possible within those days. This makes sense because the players are limited in contact. Below I have attached a four-day plan that allows a defense to install its base fronts, pressures, and coverages within the normal three-day period. I like the extra day because I feel it is important to have something to teach on that first day of pads. In the case of the install below, the fourth day rehashes base fronts and inputs drop coverages (where a defensive lineman is dropping, also known as “Drop Eight”) and three-down line movements.  Continue reading “Four Day Install Plan”

Linebacker Drills and Fundamentals

A video clinic on LB philosophy and drills.

I’ve received several questions in the past month on LB drills and if I had any tape. This video is a clinic tape a developed for former Baylor LB Coach Jim Gush. The tape goes through basic philosophies, daily reminders, and highlights multiple drills. The clinic is broken down into several sections:

  • Philosophy/Points of Emphasis
  • Techniques and Fundamentals
  • Bag Drills
  • Ball Drills
  • Pass Drops
  • Tackling Drills
  • Block Protection and Key Drills
  • Special Situations

The video itself is about 30 minutes long and is a valuable reference tool for coaching linebackers. The drills mesh well with a 4-2-5 scheme or a single-gap fitting 3-4 (Okie). Everything in this video was developed by Coach Gush. While at Baylor he developed several standout LBs and two All-Big 12 members (2011-2016):

  • Bryce Hagar (2nd – 2012/2014)
  • Eddie Lackey (1st – 2013)
  • 8 Honorable Mentions

Continue reading “Linebacker Drills and Fundamentals”

Defending the Spread From a 3-4

Running an Okie Front to defend the modern spread attack.

Defensive linemen are at a premium. For many teams, it is hard to field a deep roster that can lend itself to a four-man front. Running parallel to the defensive dilemma of lineman depth is the popularity of the spread. A natural conclusion for many defensive coordinators around the country has been a shift away from a four-down front and into a 3-4 scheme. The flexibility of the 3-4 and the added athlete on the field makes the scheme spread friendly. The multiplicity within the scheme allows DCs to attack the offense from multiple directions without sacrificing pass distributions. Running a two-high scheme behind a three-man front meshes well with teams that have a history of running a 4-2-5 or 4-3.

The Okie Front, in particular, can be of service when defensive coaches are looking to defend the spread from a three down front. With a 5 technique, a shaded Nose, and a 3 tech. (or 4i) to the weak side, the Okie’s anchor points fit the spread much like its four down sister, the Under Front. To the weak side, the Jack linebacker (boundary OLB) is technically a wide “9” in the run fits and controls the edge of the box to the boundary. The Jack LB, in particular, is useful when defending offenses that like to attack the boundary through the air. Even though the Jack is technically a conflicted player (he is responsible for the “C” gap), his alignment allows him to read the offensive tackle and slow play the run. In most four down fronts, the boundary OLB (Will) is the “fold” player and is considered conflicted because his gap is in the box. The Okie Front eliminates the fold and replaces it with a loose overhang (much like a natural Will/DE exchange in a four down front). Continue reading “Defending the Spread From a 3-4”

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MatchQuarters.com’s Philosophy of Football ::

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Go deeper into defending the spread with MQ’s Book ::

Cautious Aggression: Defending Modern Football

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Defending the Spread ::

Run Fits

  1. Zero the Mike (Belly-Key)
  2. Using Natural Gap Exchanges in Your Front Seven
  3.  Line Twists to Combat Heavy Zone Teams
  4. Defending the Zone Read
  5. Defending the Power Read
  6. Defending Split Zone
  7. 5 Tips for Defending Spread Option Teams
  8. Defending BAsh (“Back Away”) Concepts
  9. Defending 20p Two-Back Power

Coverages

  1. Defending the Air Raid with “Steal” Coverage
  2. “Read” Coverage (20p Field Robber)
  3. The Dime Package

Motions

  1. Defending Jet Motion
  2. Defending A-Behind and Flare Motion

Defending Spread Formations

  1. Defending 10p 2×2 Pistol
  2. Defending Stack and Bunch Sets
  3. Defending Trips/Empty:
    1. Why You Should Run an Under Front to 3×1 Sets
    2. Defending Trips — Fitting the Run
    3. Top Trips Coverages Explained
    4. Specific Split Field Trips Coverages:
      1. Defending Trips with Stress Coverage
      2. Defending Trips with Special Coverage
      3. Defending 3×1 Formations with Solo Coverage
    5. Defending Empty and Quads
  4. Defending Pro Spread (11p)
    1. 11 Personnel (Pro Spread)
    2. Defending single-width or “nub” formations
  5. Defending the Spread’s Top Unbalanced Sets

Defending RPOs ::

  1. RPO Stop Calls
  2. Using Split-Field Coverage to Counteract RPO & Check-With-Me Offenses

Defending Formations/Personnel Groups ::

  1. 12 Personnel (Ace/Ace Trey)
  2. 20 Personnel — Over vs Under (Setting the Strength)
  3. 21 Personnel (Defending Power Football From a Hybrid Defense)
  4. 30 Personnel
  5. Defending the Wing-T

Stop Calls/Pressures/Blitzes ::

  1. 5 Tips for Developing a Blitz
  2. How to Packaging Blitz Calls
  3. Building a Better Zone Blitz
  4. Blitzing the Formation (BTF)
  5. Run Down Stop Calls
  6. Dog Check (Single-Dog Pressure)
  7. Attacking Empty/Quads
  8. 5 Tips For Blitzing From The Secondary

Quarters Pedagogy and Drill Tapes ::

  1. Teaching the Safeties
  2. Teaching the Corners
  3. Daily Musts for DBs
  4. Match Quarters Pass Distributions
  5. LB Philosophy and Fundamentals

3-4 Resources ::

  1. The Okie Front
  2. Defending Modern Spread from Okie
  3. Defending 11p from a 3-4
  4. The Tite Front (303/404)
  5. 3rd Down Calls From a 3-4

Analytics/Install/Opponent Breakdowns/Practice/Self-Scout ::

  1. Four Day Install Plan for a 4-2-5
  2. Breaking Down an Opponent
  3. Down & Distance Data
  4. Breaking Down the Run
  5. Breaking Down the Pass
  6. Building a Hit Chart
  7. Weekly Schedule (Practice Plan)
  8. 5 Cut-ups to Improve Your Self-Scout
  9. Throw Out the Stats – “What really is a “good” defense?”

 

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