MQ Quick Hits Ep. 11 – Naming Formations

MQ breaksdown how to name opponent formations.

What’s in a name? Everything if you want to keep your opponent breakdowns efficient and clean. In this edition of Quick Hits, MQ discusses easy ways to name formations. 10, 11, and 20 pers. formations are discussed covering everything from where WRs line up to how to name the backfields. It’s all in there.

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MQ Quick Hits Ep. 9 – Breaking Down an Opponent

MQ’s clinic on how to use Hudl to breakdown an opponent’s offense.

In this episode of MQ Quick Hits, MatchQuarters demonstrates how to break down an opponent by using specific data points. Within the clinic, each data point is detailed and explained. The video breaks down 5 plays and shows how a coach can break down an opponent efficiently while giving defensive coaches more than enough data to gain tendencies.

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Defending Flare/Quick Motion

Offenses use Flare & A-Behind motion to force the defense to move. Don’t get out leveraged.

Quick motions are a great way to get the defense out leveraged. The fast motion is like eye candy for linebackers and safeties, using the speed of the receiver to get the defense to over shift. Jet motion in particular forces the defense to try and cut off the motion because of the tempo at which the motion attacks. To combat Jet motions many defenses turn to spinning towards the motion so the overhang can force a cutback. Though this technique can work in the shorthand, spinning to the motion tends to leave teams vulnerable away from the spin safety.

As offenses have evolved, quick motions have become an integral part of spread concepts. In a traditional motion, the WR changes from one side of the formation to an another on a flat path. The speed of the WR depends on the route he will run. For the most part, traditional motions have the WR jog across the formation. As the spread has evolved from traditional motion to jet motions, another way offenses have learned to attack how defenses react to motion is by flaring the running back out of the backfield. This type of quick motion forces the LBs to push and gain width between their run responsibility and the man they are responsible for in the pass. This width creates conflict, and as all defensive coaches know, offenses love conflicted players.  Continue reading “Defending Flare/Quick Motion”

Breaking Down the Run

MatchQuarter’s guide to breaking down your opponent’s run data.

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Of the two play types, breaking down the run concepts is much easier than the pass break down. There is less individual player variance and most run concepts are blocked relatively similar across offensive playbooks. The front of a defense many times will dictate the types of gap and option plays a defense might see. When looking to break down the run it is important for defenses to consider what defensive schemes are showing up in their opponent break down. If the teams in a league or district all run similar defensive schemes then the breakdown will stay relatively true across opponents. It is when teams run different fronts that the run breakdown can give false tendencies. One thing a defensive staff must keep in mind is how offenses change run schemes when facing a four-down front and a three-down front.

In order to keep the breakdown streamlined and efficient, each data point must help the staff paint a clear picture of what the offense is doing. Much like pass concepts, each offensive type (Slot-T, Air Raid, Pro Spread, etc.) has a unique way of blocking traditional runs. Formations add to the variations in blocking schemes as well. For instance, in a two-back power, the offense may choose to “J” block with the H-back and down block with the Tackle, while another offense may insert the H-back as a lead blocker and out-block with the Tackle. Each play is Power, but a defense needs to know the difference in blocking schemes. Luckily, most offenses choose a single blocking scheme and stick with it (therefore, no need to tag the variation), but when doing self-scout, it is important to be able to sort the Powers altogether and the variations between them. Even a play like Counter can be run several different ways from a two-back scheme. Is the offense pulling the Guard and Tackle, or are they using the H-back as the fold player? Add RPOs and a defensive coordinator can have a lot of information on one line. A defensive staff must have a structured, almost scientific, way of breaking down an opponent.  Continue reading “Breaking Down the Run”

Breaking Down the Pass

MatchQuarters guide to breaking down your opponents passing data.

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Once the down and distance data (D&D) and formation data are placed into a breakdown, the task turns to breaking down the plays an offense runs. Breaking down the run can be easy as long as the coaches inputting data speak the same language. At the root level, power is a power, a counter is a counter, and a zone is a zone. The biggest task in breaking down the run is if the team is a read/option team and deciding who the conflicted player is (who are they reading). In many cases, especially at the high school level, the plays are basic and can be easily labeled. Pass plays, on the other hand, are a whole different animal.

Unlike run plays that have a base set of rules and can easily be determined, pass concepts can get muddy fast. With so many moving parts and different tags to concepts, it is hard for defensive coaches to look at pass data and not have a convoluted mess. With so many variations within offenses and different tags for certain players, it can make a defensive coordinator feel like he is lost in a sea of data. Add the factor of formations (2×2 versus 3×1 pass can be much different) and it multiplies the problem.  Continue reading “Breaking Down the Pass”

Breaking Down an Opponent

Using specific data fields to find tendencies in your opponent.

My main responsibility at Baylor was to be in charge of our opponent scouting. To anyone that knows me, I am a breakdown nerd and am content sitting in a dark room all day inputting data. To me, there is nothing more exciting than objectively looking at an opponent and inputting data to mine for tendencies. There is an art to breaking down an opponent, and everyone has a different way of doing it. The objective for this article is to explain my process and to hopefully help a few coaches along the way. Not everyone enjoys the breakdown process like I do or even knows what to do with all the analytical data. I’ll try and show you a process that has worked for me and highlights tendencies within an offense. Like anything, to truly understand something you must know the “why” behind it. My goal is to explain the process in a way that makes sense to a novice.

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Use the breakdown data to create a visual representation of an offense like the one in the hit chart above.

The key to a great opponent scouting system is to approach it like a science and keep it concise. In order to get the most out of your breakdowns, you have to find a true medium between too little information and too much information. To find that perfect medium you have to understand the limitations of your staff and define what you need to know, so when you sit down to create a hit chart and cut-ups the information is easy to use. If you approach a breakdown like you are looking for a needle in a haystack (Ex. – creating a data column for every single data point possible), you can bog your staff down and get lost in data. During my three years at Baylor, I felt confident we developed that perfect medium for what our defensive coordinator, Phil Bennett, needed in order to be successful on the field. After being back the high school ranks for three years, I feel even more confident that I have found a way to break down opponents concisely while not losing myself in data points.

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Developing Down and Distance Data

How to break down the D&D data.

Down and Distance (D&D) seems easy enough, right? As the offense moves along the field, their play calling is predicated on the down (how many more plays they have left to get ten yards) and the distance (how many yards they need to get so they can start over). It is a very simplistic stat, but it has major ramifications on how offenses call their plays. Looking at the D&D stat from a simplistic eye will give a defensive coach a wide range look at how often a team runs or passes on a given down. Add personnel groupings and the data begins to get clearer.

2nd-down-markerjpg1428337613141.jpegIn order to truly get a grasp of what an offense is doing you have to create D&D groupings for long (7+), medium (4-6), and short yardage situations (1-3). This can allow a DC to pinpoint what plays are more likely in situations, allowing him to call the correct blitz or pressure at the right moment. Defense is reactionary, thus needs to react off the data that is provided by particular stats, in this case, the D&D. Pundits and coaches say it all the time, football is a situational game. The chess match that is football attests its strategy on several factors: field position, D&D, and what personnel grouping are on the field. Branching from that, formations and run/pass stats. For the sake of this article, MatchQuarters will discuss the breakdown of D&D and talk about the intricacies of each grouping. To understand completely what an offense is trying to do, the D&D should be looked at objectively with field positions groupings. The two data points combined give a true glimpse into the mind of the opponent’s OC.  Continue reading “Developing Down and Distance Data”

How To Build A Hit Chart

Take your formation breakdowns to the next level with a Hit Chart.

Once an opponent breakdown is complete the first thing a defensive staff should do is create a Hit Chart to analyze the different formations used by the offense. This is where a defensive staff can really see the fruits of their breakdown labor. Even with the advent of HUDL and other playmaking technologies, it is important to have a basic drawing of the formations a team is going to run. Especially one that a staff can manipulate, duplicate and is aesthetically pleasing.

With a Hit Chart, a defensive staff can identify quickly how they want to align to a given formation, what blitz/pressures will work against the said formation, and identify tendencies within the offensive scheme. The Hit Chart is a visual representation of an offense and can be used in multiple ways. For example, if utilizing PowerPoint, the defensive staff can create a separate slide for each formation, print them, and place them on a wall. This allows the staff to continuously look at the Hit Chart as they discuss film and meet about the game plan. This kind of quick reference guide allows the staff to efficiently answer questions regarding formations.

Hit Charts serves a broad purpose within the overall breakdown of an opponent but can give the defense an edge in playcalling if done the right way. It is important to stay efficient when creating a Hit Chart. The initial breakdown of formations is key to the quality of the chart. The more accurate the information, the better. If there are too many formation variances or mistakes, the chart loses its value.

In order to be efficient, a defensive staff should drop the use “right” and “left” formations and combine the data to give a more complete picture. A traditional 10p Doubles formation is a Doubles formation. The back being on the right or on the left in a Doubles formation really doesn’t matter. The only variance a staff could use is formation into the boundary (FIB) or when the RB aligns into the boundary in a Doubles set.

The play calling for many offenses changes when the formation is put into the boundary. This reason is why, in a Hit Chart, a defensive staff should track how many times a formation is into the boundary (Doubles, Ace, and 1×1 Diamond are the only exceptions because they are even sets). In an even set the DC can make a decision whether to keep a tally at the top of the Hit Chart (FTB/FIB) or make it a separate card. At the end of the day, the formation is still Doubles and there is no need to have separate labels as demonstrated below.

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