CoachTube Course: Developing a Game Plan

Taking the next step in the process…

The design of this course is to help coaches and staffs streamline their weekends and help with practice planning during the week.

Coach Simpson takes a Head Coach’s and offensive approach detailing how he addresses game week and developing practice for the week. Detailed in Coach Simpson’s part of the clinic are scouting tips, creating a practice plan and structure, how to get the ball to your best players, and developing film time for your athletes.

Coach Alexander approaches the clinic from a defensive perspective. Starting on Saturday, Coach A. details how to take the data from your opponent scout and create a cohesive plan for the week. Efficiency is king and Coach A. details ways to help create a streamlined plan using your entire staff. Vertical alignment, practice schedule, card building, and how to develop your data into a game plan is discussed.

There is two hours worth of content!

 

Click HERE to get the clinic!

 


Other courses by Coach A.:

  1. Designing Pressures From a Two-High Scheme
  2. Belly-Key Technique for Linebackers
  3. Breaking Down an Opponent

© 2020 MatchQuarters.com | Cody Alexander | All rights reserved.


Go deeper than just X’s and O’s. Have a philosophy.

MQ’s books are available on Amazon and Kindle:

Cautious Aggression: Defending Modern Football

Hybrids: The Making of a Modern Defense

Match Quarters: A Modern Guidebook to Split-Field Coverages

As always, support the site by following me on Twitter (@The_Coach_A) and spreading the word to your coaching friends by liking and retweeting the articles you read (even sharing them via Facebook and LinkedIn).

Do not hesitate to contact me with questions through the site’s CONTACT page or through my DM on Twitter. I enjoy speaking with you guys (iron sharpens iron).

– Coach A. | #ArtofX

 

 

MQ Quick Hits Ep. 11 – Naming Formations

MQ breaksdown how to name opponent formations.

What’s in a name? Everything if you want to keep your opponent breakdowns efficient and clean. In this edition of Quick Hits, MQ discusses easy ways to name formations. 10, 11, and 20 pers. formations are discussed covering everything from where WRs line up to how to name the backfields. It’s all in there.

Continue reading “MQ Quick Hits Ep. 11 – Naming Formations”

MQ Quick Hits Ep. 9 – Breaking Down an Opponent

MQ’s clinic on how to use Hudl to breakdown an opponent’s offense.

In this episode of MQ Quick Hits, MatchQuarters demonstrates how to break down an opponent by using specific data points. Within the clinic, each data point is detailed and explained. The video breaks down 5 plays and shows how a coach can break down an opponent efficiently while giving defensive coaches more than enough data to gain tendencies.

Continue reading “MQ Quick Hits Ep. 9 – Breaking Down an Opponent”

Defending Flare/Quick Motion

Offenses use Flare & A-Behind motion to force the defense to move. Don’t get out leveraged.

Quick motions are a great way to get the defense out leveraged. The fast motion is like eye candy for linebackers and safeties, using the speed of the receiver to get the defense to over shift. Jet motion in particular forces the defense to try and cut off the motion because of the tempo at which the motion attacks. To combat Jet motions many defenses turn to spinning towards the motion so the overhang can force a cutback. Though this technique can work in the shorthand, spinning to the motion tends to leave teams vulnerable away from the spin safety.

As offenses have evolved, quick motions have become an integral part of spread concepts. In a traditional motion, the WR changes from one side of the formation to an another on a flat path. The speed of the WR depends on the route he will run. For the most part, traditional motions have the WR jog across the formation. As the spread has evolved from traditional motion to jet motions, another way offenses have learned to attack how defenses react to motion is by flaring the running back out of the backfield. This type of quick motion forces the LBs to push and gain width between their run responsibility and the man they are responsible for in the pass. This width creates conflict, and as all defensive coaches know, offenses love conflicted players.  Continue reading “Defending Flare/Quick Motion”

How To Build A Hit Chart

Take your formation breakdowns to the next level with a Hit Chart.

Once an opponent breakdown is complete the first thing a defensive staff should do is create a Hit Chart to analyze the different formations used by the offense. This is where a defensive staff can really see the fruits of their breakdown labor. Even with the advent of HUDL and other playmaking technologies, it is important to have a basic drawing of the formations a team is going to run. Especially one that a staff can manipulate, duplicate and is aesthetically pleasing.

With a Hit Chart, a defensive staff can identify quickly how they want to align to a given formation, what blitz/pressures will work against the said formation, and identify tendencies within the offensive scheme. The Hit Chart is a visual representation of an offense and can be used in multiple ways. For example, if utilizing PowerPoint, the defensive staff can create a separate slide for each formation, print them, and place them on a wall. This allows the staff to continuously look at the Hit Chart as they discuss film and meet about the game plan. This kind of quick reference guide allows the staff to efficiently answer questions regarding formations.

Hit Charts serves a broad purpose within the overall breakdown of an opponent but can give the defense an edge in playcalling if done the right way. It is important to stay efficient when creating a Hit Chart. The initial breakdown of formations is key to the quality of the chart. The more accurate the information, the better. If there are too many formation variances or mistakes, the chart loses its value.

In order to be efficient, a defensive staff should drop the use “right” and “left” formations and combine the data to give a more complete picture. A traditional 10p Doubles formation is a Doubles formation. The back being on the right or on the left in a Doubles formation really doesn’t matter. The only variance a staff could use is formation into the boundary (FIB) or when the RB aligns into the boundary in a Doubles set.

The play calling for many offenses changes when the formation is put into the boundary. This reason is why, in a Hit Chart, a defensive staff should track how many times a formation is into the boundary (Doubles, Ace, and 1×1 Diamond are the only exceptions because they are even sets). In an even set the DC can make a decision whether to keep a tally at the top of the Hit Chart (FTB/FIB) or make it a separate card. At the end of the day, the formation is still Doubles and there is no need to have separate labels as demonstrated below.

together

Continue reading “How To Build A Hit Chart”