Evolution of the Odd Dime: Stopping the Tigers (LSU vs Auburn 2019)

The Odd Dime goes South(east).

The 2020 LSU offense will go down as one of the top offenses to ever suit up and play on Saturdays. We have all thought it (or dreaded it), what would happen if someone actually played offense in Baton Rouge? There has never been a lack of talent in the Bayou. Creativity on offense? Yes.

One of the main reasons Les Miles was fired was the lack of offensive production by the Tigers. Everywhere around the SEC, teams were turning to the Spread, but the Tigers were stuck in an antiquated system that lacked points. Orgeron was trying to get the right pieces in place and was running out of chances.

Enter Joe Brady, the nameless faceless offensive assistant for the Saints. In the Spring of ’18 Orgeron invited the staff of the Saints to come and visit. Understanding the offense needed to simplify after the Canada debacle, embrace the Spread wholly, and step further into modernity, the Tigers turned to one of the best offensive minds in the country in Sean Payton.

The main focus of the meeting would be on Saints OC Pete Carmicheal, but when the topic of RPOs and college offenses came around, Brady stole the show. Outside of the Saints office, many did not know that Brady was actually the mastermind behind many of the packages that featured do-everything athlete Tysom Hill. Brady would talk to LSU offensive staff about RPOs and the “college” packages they used in New Orleans.

Though Orgeron was not present for the meeting, he definitely heard about it. Brady had impressed the Tigers staff. Coach “O” couldn’t hire anyone at that point, but he got the chance following the ’18 campaign. Orgeron made his move. Brady would have to decide, stick with the Saints as an assistant to the assistant or go reshape the LSU offense. Sean Payton told reporters in January that he had told Brady he was making a mistake, then added: “So much for what I know!” Brady took a chance on the Tigers and it paid off immediately. The addition of modern, forward-thinking passing combined with Ensminger’s run game propelled LSU to its first National Title since 2007.

The Tigers offense will go down as one of the most efficient offenses to play since BCFToys.com began keeping track in 2007 (’18 Oklahoma is the only other at 2.20). QB Joe Burrow (#1 overall in ’20) would win the Maxwell, O’Brien, and Heisman completing the trifecta of offensive awards. Burrow would throw for 60 TDs (that’s 4 a game!) and would finish as the NCAA’s all-time leader in passer rating. The LSU QB would barely miss out on the completion percentage record. Regardless the Tigers would put up the most points in the NCAA’s history.

The WR corps of Jr. Justin Jefferson (1,000+ yards), So. Ja’Marr Chase (22nd pick in ’20 & Biletnikoff winner), So. Terrance Marshall and Jr. TE Thaddeus Moss (you know, Randy’s son) would collectively dominate opponents through the air. The use of multi-purpose RB Clyde Edwards-Helaire (32nd pick in ’20) punished teams on the ground and Brady would use his ability to catch with routes out of the backfield. Most importantly, the offensive line was dominant, winning the Joe Moore Award that goes to the best O-line unit (three were drafted in ’20). The Tigers had it all.

LSU would lead the nation with 48.4 points a game. They scored on everyone, even Bama (46) and Georgia (37). The Tigers racked up over 568 yards a game, with over 400 yards through the air. To say they were dominant is an understatement. Mississippi State would hold the Tigers to 36 points in their matchup on October 19th in Starksville. It seemed the Burrow led Tigers were unstoppable. Then the other Tigers came to Death Valley, holding LSU to a season-low 24 points and put a scare into Orgeron’s dream season. Continue reading “Evolution of the Odd Dime: Stopping the Tigers (LSU vs Auburn 2019)”

Throw Out The Stats

Five ways to judge a defense.

“Some teams will play 55 snaps today. I think we defended 17 possessions, 110 (snaps), so we just played two ball games… That’s why the yardage thing is so irrelevant.”

– Glenn Spencer/DC, Oklahoma St. | via Kyle Fredrickson, NewsOK.com.

It’s time for defensive coaches everywhere to start changing the way they view modern defensive football. The “spread movement” is real, and it is not going away. The spread scheme, though vast in its styles has one basic principle, create one-on-one matchups by using the entire width of the field. Adding tempo to spread schemes creates more possessions and opportunities to score points. It is not uncommon for college teams to run 90+ offensive plays in a game or a high school offense to reach 75-80+ plays. As the amount of snaps being played in a game increase, it puts more pressure on the defense to line up correctly and play every snap. Most teams in the Big 12 will play a half game or more each week compared to its SEC counterparts. As Glenn Spencer stated in the quote above, the yardage stat is becoming less relevant than ever before. To gauge how great a defense is in the modern football era defensive coaches and pundits everywhere need to readjust the standards for what makes a great defense.

Five Points of Emphasis

Points Per Possession

Conditioning against tempo teams is a premium for the defensive side of the ball. More possessions create more opportunities for points, thus more opportunity for mistakes. Spread teams operate by creating one-on-one matchups and “spreading” the field to create space. As more spread teams implement tempo and gain more possessions, the old stats of yards per game and points per game become irrelevant. If a team gives up 28 points and defends 8 possessions (3.5 PPP), are they better than a defense that gives up 35 points but defends 15 possessions (2.3 PPP)? Defensive coaches need to be less infatuated with yards and points. The only points that matter are the ones needed to win a game. The PPP stat evens out teams that play spread versus teams that play traditional huddle-up offenses. If looking at the PPP stat, one can better determine the strength of the defense because it focuses on how many drives turn into scoring drives. A drive is a drive, the difference is how many did a team defend, and did it give up some points? A good number for a defense is anything under 2 points, elite is under 1.5. Continue reading “Throw Out The Stats”